Week 36 … #10 Leading Lines …Is that an Armadillo?

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Bells Bridge/Clyde Auditorium, Glasgow, Scotland

Often times when I first encounter a big city, I like to use the Hop On Hop Off bus to get an overview and then later visit the sites that interest me.  We did this in Glasgow, catching the 2nd bus of the day with only a few people and a good, informed entertaining guide.  With only 2 days in Glasgow, I had to pick and choose what I wanted to see and photograph and one particular site was this cool old bridge with the armadillo-looking structure just across from it.  We caught a taxi to the site who alerted us that the area across the bridge might be quite busy that evening due to a concert at the auditorium.  Lo and behold, it was the Backstreet Boys (I own none of their music!) and the average age of the concert goers was probably 22.  We also learned later that evening as we had drinks at our hotel, that the band group was staying there as well!  We just couldn’t shake those guys!

I really wanted to get this shot because I loved the juxtapositon of the building from across the walkway.  I had to frequently wait as folks came and went across the bridge but finally got this image.  I thought it would make a good one for the “leading lines” theme.  I used a Nikon 24-70 at 1/160 sec at f/22, ISO 1400 due to the evening clouds and edited it in Photomorphis.

Week 35 … #15 Leading Lines … Scotland Street Scene

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Historical Victoria Street, Edinburgh, Scotland

Hubby and I have been driving around the lush hills of Scotland for the last 10 days, making a circular journey from Glasgow to the Isle of Skye to the Highlands down to Edinburgh and back to Glasgow.  I was prepared for rain every day, but soon found out, one could never predict if the day brought sunshine, rain or just clouds.  Weather apps be damned!  We were armed with whatever the day would bring!  One thing I didn’t expect were the long daylight hours.  I loved it.  Sunset was around 10pm but didn’t really get dark until 11pm and daylight began at 4am.  The unfortunate part of that though, was that I was never out and about for either a sunrise or sunset!  Hours were too early or too late for me … I was a tired girl every day from our travels.

I had put together an itinerary of photo sights I wanted to capture on our travels and one of them was the image above.  Victoria Street in Edinburgh, with colorful shop fronts, an elegant cobble stone curve in the road, and high old stone buildings towering above, was said to have inspired Diagon Alley in Harry Potter.  (There were many Harry Potter shops!)  I thought the three curved lines starting at the left of the image along with the road below made for a perfect “leading lines” assignment.  It was a rainy, dreary day, so some edits were made with Snapseed and DistressedFX on this iPhone image.

Week 34 … #26 Loneliness … Nature at it’s Harshest

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Cape Buffalo, Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

On one of our evening drives in Kenya looking for wildlife, we came upon this old Cape Buffalo, lying in the open, alone.  He looked tired and lethargic and took no heed of our jeep as we pulled near … just calmly chewing his cud and watching us unalarmed.  No other buffalo was around which seemed unusual, since they tend to stay in herds.   Our Masai Mara guide explained to us that old bulls, like him, have been kicked out of the herd by younger, more virile males and lead a solitary existence.  Unfortunately, without the  protection of a herd, old bulls commonly fall prey to lions.  I wonder if this ended up being his fate.

Week 33 … #5 Macro … Beetle, Beetle

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June Beetle on Cacti Flower, Selby Botanical Garden, Sarasota

I have done very little macro photography but when we planned our visit to Selby Gardens, I thought it might be the perfect place to experiment.  I didn’t take my tripod and I quickly discovered that it’s almost impossible to capture a sharp image without one when doing macro shots.  But it was fun  …  learning and experimenting with the light and my camera settings but I’ve got a long way to go to capture good macro shots!

This was captured with my Nikon D810, 60mm, edited in Lightroom.

 

Week 32 … #28 Wild Card … A Momentary Pose

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Fiscal Shrike in Tanzania Bush

There were so many beautiful birds we spotted on our recent Africa trip and … so many that I didn’t capture on camera.  The ones I was able to capture, were not always photo sharp, to my dismay.  But still, they provide wonderful memories.  I so love birds and hope to get better at capturing their distinct beauty.

“Everyone likes birds. What wild creature is more accessible to our eyes and ears, as close to us and everyone in the world, as universal as a bird?”
Nature historian David Attenborough

Week 31 … #21 The Wild Side

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Lioness, Ngala Wildlife Preserve, South Africa

Battle scars.

This lioness from the Birmingham pride had just risen from her suckling cubs when I noticed the wound on her nose, probably caused from a scrap with another lion.   It’s a wild wild world they live in with no guarantees that they will see tomorrow.

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Week 30 … #14 Humor …McDonalds!

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Impalas, Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

One wildlife animal that was plentiful on the Kenya plains were Impalas.  We saw so many, we began calling them “McDonalds” due to their rear-end markings that looked like the McDonald’s logo.  And secondly, because they are the fast food item for lions, leopards and cheetahs.  So it became a standard joke every time we saw an impala herd we spoke out “Oh look, there’s some more McDonalds!”

Most baby impalas are born mid-day as this is the safest time to give birth since most of their enemies are resting.  Unfortunately, half of newborns are killed by predators within the first few weeks of life.  A fascinating fact that our guide shared was that impala mothers can delay giving birth for up to a month if weather conditions are harsh, such as during the wet season.  But upon looking up this fact, it is more a myth than reality.  It is  believed that to cope with poor conditions, impalas may choose to abandon or abort their young rather than risk their own lives to look after a lamb whose likelihood of survival is marginal at best.  A sad reality on the plains of Africa.